Tag Archives: Luisa Dantas

New Day: Breaking the Distribution Mold

In the competitive world of film distribution, it can be easy to forget that there is a more personal and direct way of operating. National Co-op Month in October is a good time to celebrate our rare and unique status as a distribution co-op. We have banded together as engaged filmmakers and activists to collectively market and sell our films. By purchasing or licensing titles from our collection you not only gain access to thought-provoking educational materials, but you also support a unique model that empowers New Day filmmakers to maintain ownership of our films and to use our earnings in sustaining careers devoted to education, activism, and change-making.

New Day was initially formed in 1971 because the women’s movement had arrived and a group of independent filmmakers couldn’t find distribution for their feminist films. “The whole idea of distribution,” explains co-founder Julia Reichert, “was to help the women’s movement grow. Films could do that; they could get the ideas out. We could watch the women’s movement spread across the country just by who was ordering our films. First it was Cambridge and Berkeley. I remember the first showing in the deep South.”

Central to our co-op’s identity is the democratic way that we self-govern. Each voice is valued and decisions about how to grow and improve our service is done collectively. Major efforts are guided by a volunteer Steering Committee drawn from the pool of members-owners in the co-op. A biennial transfer of governance to other members assures that leadership is broadly shared and frequently infused with new ideas and perspectives.

Being a part of New Day Films is such a breath of fresh air which makes me feel inspired and energized. New Day is filled with experienced and powerful storytellers, there to help and support you, making you not only a better filmmaker, but also thrive as an individual and as a collective.
Najma Nuriddin, Not in My Neighbourhood



As a Latina filmmaker, I have been welcomed into the New Day community with open arms. It’s been amazing to be a part of such a supportive and engaged group of storytellers whose powerful films are having a real impact in the world.
Luisa Dantas, Land of Opportunity

Our collection includes award-winning films that investigate global concerns like criminal justice, environmental issues, gender & sexuality, and immigration. New Day films have challenged and inspired audiences everywhere, from high school classrooms to Capitol Hill. We continue to be sustained by the ideas that inspired our formation: collaboration, hope and social change.

Thank you for your continued support of the longest-running distribution cooperative for independent filmmakers in the US!

August 2018 Commemorative Month

August 29 marks the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and New Day Films has a number of relevant documentaries that look deeply at the history and future of New Orleans.

Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans

Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, by Dawn Logsdon, explores the birthplace of civil rights, the New Orleans neighborhood that gave birth to jazz, launched America’s first black newspaper, and nurtured generations of Black activists.

Land of Opportunity

Land of Opportunity by Luisa Dantas and Rebecca Snedeker, dives deep into the tumultuous post-Katrina reconstruction of New Orleans through the eyes of urban planners, community organizers, displaced youth, immigrant workers, and public housing residents.

Mr. Cao Goes to Washington

Mr. Cao Goes to Washingtonby Leo Chiangfollows the journey of one of New Orlean’s rising political stars. Rep. Joseph Cao is the first Vietnamese American elected to the US Congress, the only non-white House Republican of the 111th Congress, and the only Republican to vote for President Obama’s Health Care Reform Bill. Can he keep his integrity and idealism intact in the face of political realities?

A Village Called Versailles
A Village Called Versailles, also by Leo Chiang, is the inspiring account of a community of Vietnamese refugees in New Orleans who rebuild their homes after Hurricane Katrina— only to have them threatened by a toxic landfill planned in their neighborhood. As the community fights back, it turns a devastating disaster into a catalyst for change.

Young Aspirations/Young Artists, by Shirley Thompson, is about a youth arts program that thrived in New Orleans before the flooding, and regrouped afterward in order to continue to offer life-changing opportunities to young artists in New Orleans.