All posts by Kathy Huang

I Am New Day: Mina T. Son

minatson-fb-photoI gravitate towards making films in different languages and cultures, which poses numerous challenges but ultimately is an incredibly fulfilling experience, which is probably why I keep making them.

My documentary Making Noise in Silence is about Korean and Deaf culture from the perspective of two teens. Growing up as a Korean American, I definitely struggled with my ethnic and cultural identity. When you’re young, it’s harder to see that being different can be a good thing and instead, you just focus on how different you are from your friends and wish to be more like everyone else. So I naturally became curious about these two teenagers and their experiences being Korean American, as well as being Deaf.

When I first started making this film, I didn’t realize the unique challenges I would face in communicating with my subjects. Over email, sometimes we’d write in Korean or English. Then in person, we communicated in American Sign Language through an interpreter or wrote words on a piece of paper. When I was filming, I didn’t have simultaneous interpreting, so if there was a conversation happening, the interpreter wouldn’t fill me in until I stopped rolling because I didn’t want her voice in the film. On a few occasions, I filmed without knowing exactly what was happening and had to rely on my instincts. Because of these circumstances, I tried to be even more aware of how my subjects were feeling and tried to check in often to make sure they were comfortable with the filming process.

Learn more about Mina and her work here.

New Day Films for January & February

January 18, 2015 is World Religion Day

TheCampaign_FILM_IMAGEThis commemorative day was established by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of the United States as a way to encourage people to “talk to and listen to people from faiths different than their own and to understand the basic tenants of other religions.” New Day has an extensive collection of films about Religion, Theology and Ethics to help in this endeavor.

February is Black History Month

FbDK8nPMIPay tribute to the generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society. Check out New Day’s collections of films about African Americans and the African diaspora before planning your events for 2015.

Granito wins 2014 BritDoc Impact Award

itunes_granitoNew Day is proud to announce that Granito, by Pamela Yates, Paco de Onis and Peter Kinoy, has received a 2014 BRITDOC Impact Award. Granito tells the extraordinary story of how the filmmakers’ 1982 film When The Mountains Tremble aided a new generation of human rights activists and helped tip the scales of justice in Guatemala. Ultimately, dictator General Efraín Ríos Montt was pronounced guilty of committing genocide and crimes against humanity against the Maya Ixil people, and sentenced to 80 years in prison.

“Granito serves as a vital reminder that courageous documentary filmmakers can profoundly impact the cause of justice in the world,” said Jury Member Amy Goodman, who is also the Host & Executive Producer of Democracy Now!. “This film helped the Maya people of Guatemala hold the perpetrators of their genocide accountable. It poignantly portrays their suffering, their resistance and their hope for the future.”

The BRITDOC Impact Award celebrates “the documentary films that have made the greatest impact on society.” Granito shares the award with American Promise, Blackfish, The House I Live In and No Fire Zone. Each film receives $15,000 to reward their commitment, passion and achievements in using storytelling to provoke change.

Since 2005, BRITDOC has been developing expertise around impact and evaluation in documentary film. The organization’s Impact Field Guide & Toolkit is a new free online curriculum designed to help those who are working with film improve their impact.  For more information about BRITDOC’s impact reports and educational tools visit britdoc.org.

New Day Films Cross the Globe

by Isabel Hill, New Day member

Through the American Film Showcase, New Day members are finding new audiences in countries as varied as the Dominican Republic, South Korea, Uzbekistan and Zimbabwe. In the process, they are introducing filmmakers to the documentary genre and expanding understanding of the vital role independent media can have in social change.

Funded by the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and administered by the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts, the American Film Showcase (AFS) brings award-winning American documentary and independent narrative films to audiences across the globe. The filmmakers are paired with a local film expert to facilitate activities that go beyond screenings and Q&A sessions to include workshops and master classes.

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Uranium Drive-In

Suzan Beraza, whose New Day film Uranium Drive-In was included in the AFS, just returned from a ten-day stay in the Dominican Republic. Beraza’s favorite part of the experience, aside from the screenings themselves, were the one-on-one workshops. “You could see the wheels turning,” she related. “Making films is a powerful way of telling and keeping stories alive, and it was so exciting to watch the students start to understand this and to look at filmmaking in a very different way.”

Alice Elliott was one of the first New Day members to join the Showcase under its predecessor program, the American Documentary Showcase. She traveled to Uzbekistan, where she spent ten days showing her film Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy and participating in workshops for people with disabilities. It was the first time that the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan had hosted an audience of people in wheelchairs.

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Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy

Modeling a critical concept that is central to the disability rights movement in the United States — “Nothing about us without us” – Elliott included Diana, a main character in her film, in the journey. Showing that people with disabilities can travel and be out in the world stands out in a country like Uzbekistan, where this is far from the usual practice. Alice took note of the many barriers to mobility for disabled individuals in Uzbekistan and came home with a fuller awareness of the rights we have fought to attain in this country.

Deaf Jam, a film by Judy Lieff, was shown in South Korea, Turkey, and Zimbabwe. The venues, approaches, and audiences were radically different in each country.

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Deaf Jam

In South Korea, Judy met with deaf students to screen her film and talk about disability rights. South Korea is a country where disabled people are largely shunned (see Mina Son’s excellent documentary Making Noise in Silence for more on this topic), so it was particularly important to empower this group of students to talk openly about cultural practices and to encourage them to find their individual and collective voices through poetry. Leiff also helped educate independent filmmakers and activists in South Korea about disability rights in the United States, and about how to effectively organize communities of people with disabilities. She also met with broadcast producers to help them understand why it is paramount to include and embrace a diverse audience.

With a backdrop of protests taking place in Turkey, Judy’s participation in the Showcase there was poignant. The U.S. Embassy reached out to schools it had never worked with before because of Judy’s film and her involvement with deaf communities. In Turkey, there is no standardized sign language and, as in South Korea, people with disabilities are often an invisible part of society. In addition, educational distribution for documentaries has not been fully explored, so Leiff met with university students and independent filmmakers, festival organizers, and local producers to discuss New Day’s cooperative structure.

Zimbabwe presented unexpected challenges as well. There, there are no broadcast outlets for filmmakers and no distribution opportunities, so the time there was spent exclusively with independent filmmakers. Leiff offered advice and resources, feedback on rough cuts, information about New Day’s unique model, and encouragement to work together to enhance their power and visibility as agents for disseminating ideas and information, and effecting change.

Judy came away from her participation in the AFS with a clear and potent realization of the intrinsic value of our films as educational tools in a variety of global contexts. “New Day members are real teachers, whether they hold an academic post or not, and it is the educational value of both our films and us as filmmakers that makes this international connection so valuable,” she recounted.

The Showcase focuses on topics that include civil rights, disabilities, social justice, sports, freedom of the press, technology, and the environment—subjects that are the DNA of our cooperative. The organization recognizes the educational value of our films on an international level and the capacity of New Day filmmakers to serve as grassroots educators in areas where films and filmmakers are not part of the mainstream. It is a great fit for New Day Films, and increasingly our members are partnering with this organization to further our mission of reaching diverse audiences with our pressing messages, and collaborating with and teaching other filmmakers in different countries. It offers us, as filmmakers, an opportunity to be international emissaries for our respective causes and issues, and it shows our ability, as a collective, to be a far-reaching force for positive social change.

I Am New Day: Ellen Bruno

ELLEN_BRUNO_PHOTOI have spent most of my adult life working with survivors of traumatic circumstances including war, genocide, disease, and slavery, first as a relief worker and then as a documentary filmmaker. These experiences have taught me again and again the resilience of the human spirit and the healing power of compassion.

I am a child of divorce, and the mother of two young children. When my partner and I separated, I searched extensively for information, resources and support to help our children through this experience. In spite of discovering a wealth of literature and professional expertise for adults, I found few media tools to help me guide my children through the challenges they faced.

My film SPLIT is a candid, poignant, and often humorous film about kids and divorce made exclusively from the point of view of children. There are no adults and no experts – just kids speaking the powerful truth of what is on their minds and in their hearts as their families change. It is a tool to help children of divorce begin to talk, process, and heal … and to encourage parents to choose a less contentious path as they move through separation.

Learn more about Ellen and her work here.

Why Make Personal Social Issue Films?

By Greta Schiller, New Day Member

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“Nana, Mom and Me

One of the films that touched me as a young woman is Amalie Rothschild’s Nana, Mom and Me.  Today it is a classic film; in the seventies it broke new ground. Using photographs, old home movies and direct interviews with her mother and grandmother as well as herself, Rothschild explores the mother-daughter ties in three generations of her own family. In the process she explores the classic female problem faced by her artist mother: the conflict between work and children – the necessary compromises, the incumbent anxieties. The structure is intentionally loose and open-ended, like a good conversation, emphasizing the need to ask the right questions rather than give pat answers.

Recently I watched Rothschild’s film again, this time as a mother struggling with many of the same issues nearly four decades after the film was made.  Returning to the film I thought about how the first-person approach has persisted and evolved over the decades. According to the American University Center for Social Media, “Personal essay films are particularly good at dramatizing the human implications and consequences of large social forces.”

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By Invitation Only

I spoke with several New Day filmmakers who included themselves on-screen, and found many didn’t set out to include themselves in their films. Some found themselves taking a first-person approach for strategic reasons. In the film By Invitation Only, about the elite, white Carnival societies and debutante balls of Mardi Gras, director Rebecca Snedeker started working with cinema verite footage and interviews. Over time, though, she realized that,

“I had questions that I wanted the film to explore that we could not clearly address through my central character. The first-person narrative allowed us to tease out topics, to gently ask questions and offer reflections. These debutante and carnival traditions are such a foreign, mysterious world to most people, even here in New Orleans, and images of them conjure immediate assumptions and prejudices; just showing the observational footage I was able to capture probably wouldn’t have moved many viewers to a new place, or inspire them to consider the push and pull of other traditions and status quo situations in their own lives.”

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My Brooklyn

Similarly, Kelly Anderson decided to put her own story, as a Brooklyn “gentrifier,” into My Brooklyn after she had been editing the film for several years. “I was worried it would be too self-indulgent – another filmmaker in her own movie? Please!” she says. But her perspective, as a white person who was concerned with issues of racial and economic equality, but who had also been part of demographic change in formerly Black or Latino neighborhoods, proved a good entry point for many viewers. “In the end, it was about making a policy-dense film feel more approachable and interesting, and also about the ethics of representing others in a situation you are a part of, and how to do that honestly,” Anderson says.

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Eating Alaska

When she moved to Alaska, vegetarian Ellen Frankenstein was confronted with new eating challenges, and decided to make a film about it. “I wanted to make an environmental film focused on food, but I didn’t want to point fingers or do it in a simple style,” Frankenstein says. “I didn’t set out to be in Eating Alaska. I put myself in the film as the provocateur, on a journey to figure out what made sense to eat. It has been a great tool for allowing audiences to talk about the choices they make everyday.”

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When I Came Home

Some of the most compelling reasons filmmakers put themselves into their own films are ethical. In the case of Dan Lohaus, whose film When I Came Home is about homeless veterans on the hard streets of New York City, it was his own sense of humanity that drove him to “cross the line” and include himself. When his lead character Herold contemplates suicide as winter sets in, the filmmaker allows him to sleep on his couch.  When Dan steps in front of the camera and has to invite a buddy in to film the turn of events, the objective relationship is altered, as is the film’s style and structure.

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No Dinosaurs In Heaven

There are a million stories in New York, and the third one I will mention is my own film No Dinosaurs In Heaven. I was also hesitant to include my image and voice-over, but I felt it was dishonest not to let the audience know that I was in fact a student in the biology class of the creationist professor.  I felt his behavior was dishonest, and that I needed to be very up front about my relationship to him and to the topic of creationism. No film had ever attempted to diagram the way an individual can manipulate liberal educational philosophy into a tolerance for creationism in the science classroom. It was my point of view that a creationist could not teach science, and in fact he was deliberately hiding his anti-science belief to promote religion.

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Seeking Asian Female

Some filmmakers find the power relations inherent in documentary filmmaking reversed when their subjects draw them into the filmmaking process. Asian American filmmaker Debbie Lum began work on Seeking Asian Female intending to make an objective film about men who are obsessed with Asian women. “The original idea was to turn the tables on these men and make an objective film about their objectification of Asian women,” Lum says. But when the main character in her film found a woman in China who was half his age to come live with him in San Francisco, she found herself in an unexpected position. “As I filmed and sparks flew, they began to lean on me to translate and my role morphed from documentary observer to marriage counselor. The journey that all three of us went on was full of unexpected lessons, not the least of which was that we all had quite ingrained stereotypes that we had to confront as we got to know each other more personally.”

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Sunshine

The family is the most obvious choice for personal stories in social issue films and New Day has several deeply personal and daringly intimate films. In Father’s Day, Mark Lipman uses evocative home movies and poetic imagery to immerse viewers in conversations about death, suicide, mental illness, memory and the choices we make in creating a family. In Sunshine, Karen Skloss explores the meaning of family through her own journey to understand the legacy of her own birth and the nontraditional family she created by co-parenting with her ex-boyfriend.  “These kinds of films hold great risk of being self-indulgent,” Skloss says. “But I thought that if it were honest enough and went deeply enough that it would resonate for an audience and open up a lot of areas for conversation – which it has.”

Unlike Reality TV or programming strands that rely on formulaic story structure – usually two central characters on either side of an issue – New Day embraces many storytelling devices. This makes our collection both strong in its diversity and evergreen as we delve deeply and sometimes personally into the zeitgeist of our times.


 

 

New Day Films for December

December is Universal Human Rights Month

NUR_JusticeJackson-1More than 60 years ago, the UN General Assembly approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, declaring the “inherent dignity” and “equal and inalienable rights” of all human beings as the “foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Order your New Day titles for Universal Human Rights Month now.

Tips for Using New Day Films in the Classroom

  • Choose films that tell a compelling story. Stories provide the conduit for conveying information. Most people don’t remember pure facts – but we are hard-wired to remember stories. Ask students to share their own stories as a counterpoint to the film’s stories.
Students take in a screening of "Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines"
Students screen New Day film “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines
  • Check if the film has a companion study guide. Many New Day films include guides that offer detailed background information on the film’s subject, notes on running a successful discussion, a sample lesson plan, and additional resources.
  • Frame the film prior to viewing. Explain which elements relate to the course, e.g. anthropology students might identify moments of cultural significance and their relationship to the topic of study. Film is a rich medium, and students often need framing to notice and process the types of information most relevant to their learning.
  • Assign a feature film like you would assign a book. Use class time for discussion and collaboration. This allows students to time-shift their learning, review the film on their own, and take notes at their own pace. Most New Day titles are available via online streaming.
  • Don’t discount the power of the moving image. Students often learn in a deeper and more thorough way through visual media!
  • Pair two films together. Contrasting films on similar subjects from different regions, eras, or cultures can highlight commonalities and differences across a wide spectrum of issues.
  • Use a film to open up discussion on a difficult topic, such as race, gender, religion, adoption, or sexuality. Film is an emotional medium, and social justice documentaries can often elicit deeper and more thoughtful classroom discussions than texts.
  • Ask students to write down three quick “take-aways” from the film, before discussion starts. What did they find enlightening, compelling, or relevant? Collect the statements and share them aloud. The variety of observations may be surprising.
  • Organize a cross-disciplinary screening series. Including multiple departments helps save funds in tight budget times, and also inspires rich interdisciplinary discussions about issues that can be looked at from many points of view.
  • Use a film as a starting point for research or project assignments. Films are a powerful tool for getting students interested in a particular topic. Ask students to identify an element in the film – a character, a group, a location – and create an independent project around it.
  • Invite the filmmaker to your class, to enrich the students’ understanding of the material. Ask students to turn in questions for the filmmaker ahead of time, and prepare a few questions of your own. Many New Day filmmakers are available for Q&A, either via Skype or in person.
Filmmaker Kristy Guevara Flanagan fields some questions
“Wonder Women!” filmmaker Kristy Guevara-Flanagan participates in a student-led Q&A

New Day at the People’s Climate March

New Day filmmakers joined more than 300,000 people at the People’s Climate March on September 21 in New York City, adding our collective voice to the growing effort to force global leaders to address climate change. For post-march activities, check out New Day’s extensive collection of environmental titles here.

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New Day Films for November

November is Native American Heritage Month

E Haku Inoa To Weave A Name square stillAt the turn of the 20th Century, various Native Americans campaigned for a national day of recognition for the contributions of the first Americans to the culture and heritage of the United States. A hundred years later, we have an entire month designated for that purpose! Check out New Day’s titles that tell the stories and history of indigenous people in the United States and beyond.

I Am New Day: Debbie Lum

DLum_Headshot2I’m a San Francisco-based Asian American woman who was born in Virginia and raised in the Midwest. All my life I’ve been hit on and harassed by men who are obsessed with Asian women, and I’ve always wanted to know why so many Western men develop “Yellow Fever” or “Asian Fetish.”

My documentary film Seeking Asian Female tells the story of two strangers – an aging white man with an “Asian fetish” and a young woman from China. They meet online and attempt to build a marriage from scratch in California. During the filming, I became their translator and eventually their marriage counselor.

“Asian fetish” and the objectification of Asian women is a very loaded issue in the Asian American community, yet had always been unrecognized by the mainstream. I tried to approach the subject with honesty and a sense of humor to engender open discussion and shed light the assumptions and prejudices that exist on all sides. Seeking Asian Female ‘s raw, intimate drama is a universal love story for the ages — albeit a complicated one.

Learn more about Debbie and her work here.

 

I Am New Day: Kimberly Bautista

Kimberly-Bautista-headshot(1)I had been involved in solidarity work since 2003 to raise awareness about the violent murders of women in Juarez, Mexico, and that work connected me to feminists working in Guatemala. I began production on a documentary film, Justice for My Sister, which follows a Guatemalan single mother of five on a heroic journey to hold her sister’s killer accountable. When I myself became a target of sexual assault, and experienced first-hand the corruption and complicity of the Guatemalan justice system, I decided my film needed to do more than raise awareness – it needed to be part of a bigger violence prevention campaign. I formed the Justice for My Sister Collective with advocates in Guatemala and Los Angeles, and we’ve published a trainer’s training guide, a text-message campaign toolkit, and an activity booklet. We’ve held workshops and screenings with indigenous communities, immigrants, survivors of violence, service providers and police in 20 countries and counting. The film has won Best Documentary in Holland, Los Angeles, Bolivia, and Central America. I have toured universities and embassies to promote healthy relationships, and have since established a non-profit organization in LA to continue the campaign’s work.

For more information about Justice for My Sistervisit  http://www.justiceformysister.com/

New Day Films for October

Order Now!

Hispanic Heritage Month is Sept. 15 to Oct. 15

LatinHeritageHispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. Mexico, Chile and Belize also celebrate their independence days during this period. New Day has an extensive collection of films — including several brand new ones — that celebrate and explore the culture and politics of Latinos in the US and beyond.

October is National Community Planning Month

CommPlanningEach year the American Planning Association sponsors National Community Planning Month to raise the visibility of the important role of planners and planning in communities across the U.S. The theme for 2014 is Health and Prosperity. New Day has an exciting array of films about urban planning and related issues that can raise dialogue and encourage participation in your community.

New Day Films Inspire Social Justice Heroes from Edward Snowden to Amanda Blackhorse

by Lynne Sachs, New Day Member

For most New Day filmmakers, the reason we make documentary films has as much to do with social and political impact as it does with festival awards, box office returns or DVD sales. Though we all know our films contribute to education and change in broad ways, in this article we look at how change can be sparked when just one person sees the right film at the right time.

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NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden was being interviewed via Skype by Daniel Ellsberg at the recent Hope X conference, and at the head of the interview, after thanking Ellsberg for his service, Snowden went on to say, “I watched a a documentary of your life as I was grappling with these [whistleblowing] issues myself.  It had a deep impact; it really shaped my thinking.”  The documentary Snowden was referring to was The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers, by New Day filmmaker Rick Goldsmith and Judith Ehrlich. 

In search of an example of an older New Day film’s influence on the sway of history, we communicated with Amanda Blackhorse, the Navajo social worker who decided to sue the NFL in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc. Since she was an undergraduate at the University of Kansas, Blackhorse has been profoundly troubled by the use of the name “Washington Redskins” as a mascot. She took this concern to court and on June 18, 2014, the United States Patent and Trademark Office voted to cancel the six trademarks held by the team in a decision that held that the term “redskins” is disparaging to a “substantial composite of Native Americans.” Of course the case is already in appeal, but nevertheless we decided to ask Blackhorse if she had ever seen Jay Rosenstein’s In Whose Honor, a 1997 documentary that takes a critical look at the practice of using American Indian mascots and nicknames in sports, and is still widely used today.

Here’s what Blackhorse had to say:

The documentary influenced me as far as understanding the way in which Native mascots perpetuate the dehumanization of Native American people. Seeing how disrespectful and brutal people were toward Charlene Teters (in the film) was an eye opener. The waters are usually calm until a Native American stands up to injustice and the backlash has no mercy. I saw first hand how power, money, and white privilege hold more power with regard to Native mascots than do Native Americans themselves.”

Whether we’re looking at the astonishing array of recent Global Warming themed films, the surge of Gay and Lesbian voices in our culture, or our very earliest documentaries that speak to the women’s rights movement of the 1970s, films like these in our New Day Films collection continue to reveal the way that media can change the direction of American history, sometimes by inspiring one person.

 

New Day Makes the B-Corp A-List!

By Isabel Hill, New Day Member

Earlier this year, New Day completed an intensive process that resulted in a designation of “B Corporation” for our social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency as a company. We are proud to announce that New Day has now been placed on the 2014 B Corp “Best for Communities” List!

We were given this honor because we earned a community impact score in the top 10% of all Certified B Corporations on the B Impact Assessment, a comprehensive evaluation of a company’s impact on its workers, community, and the environment.

New Day is one of 86 businesses that earned this score, placing us in the midst of an exciting global movement. In fact, 34% of our fellow “Best for Communities” winners are from outside the United States. These are companies that have taken the lead in delivering beneficial products and services, building local living economies, creating Fair Trade supply chains, and innovating through diversity.

We celebrate being in the forefront of a global movement to redefine success in business and it is our hope that one day all companies will compete to be not just the best in the world but the best for the world.

For more information about B-Corps visit: http://www.bcorporation.net/b-the-change

Wrapping up the 2014 ASA Annual Meeting

On the last night of the ASA meeting, we were joined by an even younger set of New Day filmmakers-in-training: Debbie Lum’s daughters Nina and Anna!

photo 1 New Day’s youngest representatives at ASA 2014.

Later on, we got to attend the plenary session, where the keynote speech was by author and intellectual superstar Malcolm Gladwell. Gladwell spoke about privilege, discrimination and tokenism, focusing on the examples of Elizabeth Thompson (Lady Butler) and Moses Mendelssohn. The sociologists really gave him a hard time during the Q&A afterwards – challenging both his assumptions and methods (Gladwell comes from a psychology background, and openly acknowledged that his academic perspective might be different). But overall his talk was warmly received, and we thoroughly enjoyed it.

photo 2 Malcolm Gladwell delivers the keynote speech at ASA 2014.

Attendance was really high in the exhibition hall on the last day – we had people still at our booth asking questions a full ten minutes after the 1pm cut-off! Yun and I were pretty exhausted by the end, but New Day classics member Frances Nkara came to our rescue, helping us get everything packed up into a remarkably small number of boxes. We shipped everything out to the east coast team that will be representing New Day Films at the National Media Market later this fall.

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Frances our Fairy Godmother takes charge of the packing-up process.

ASA Conference, Day 3

By Vanessa Warheit, New Day Member

Today, Debbie Lum joined the New Day team at Booth 301 – and a lot of ASA attendees were delighted to meet the celebrity star of “Seeking Asian Female”!
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Debbie Lum with a “Seeking Asian Female” fan from Connecticut

We had another whirlwind day of conversations on a wide range of topics. Among the many visitors to our booth, we chatted with Josh LePree, a PhD candidate and sociology instructor from CU Boulder, who teaches diversity, race/ethnicity, and classes on gender, race, and the state. Josh told us, “I love showing films in my classes – and I feel so blessed to know there are filmmakers like you who see the world the same way we do! And my students really love it when I show films – I think it’s one of the reasons why I get such good teaching scores.”

Photo 2“I’m so happy that New Day exists!” says Matthew Eddy, assistant professor of sociology at Minot State University in North Dakota. Shown here with New Day filmmakers Yun Suh and Debbie Lum.

Photo 3Vanessa Warheit with Ted Cohen, Professor and Chair of Sociology & Anthropology at Ohio Wesleyan University, who told us: “I’ve never used a New Day film I didn’t love!

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Vanessa Warheit with Boaz & Eva Kahana, a husband-and-wife team from Cleveland State University.

Our crew also sat in on a few of the many relevant panel presentations – including sessions on gender, diversity, and indigenous populations. And we’ve finally got the discount code sorted out! Hooray for the New Day web team!
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Debbie Lum, trying to sort out the ASA discount code…

ASA Conference, Day 2

By Vanessa Warheit, New Day Member

Greetings from San Francisco! New Day filmmakers Regan Brashear, Yun Suh, and Vanessa Warheit have been here for the past two days, representing New Day at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. The theme of this year’s conference is “Hard Times: The Impact of Economic Inequality on Families and Individuals” – and we’ve got a LOT of relevant material. Some of the sociologists visiting our booth already know about New Day (particularly those who have been working on reproductive sociology since the 70s), but for a lot of them our booth is their first glimpse into the wide array of films we have on offer.

photo 3Regan and Yun chatting with sociologists at ASA14.

photo 4Regan and Vanessa at the New Day Films Booth #301

For instance – Gloria Gonzalez-Lopez, of U.T. Austin, whose work focuses on sexual violence. When she first came by the booth, she looked skeptical, and didn’t even want to put her card in our drawing (we’ll be giving away a free DVD to one lucky winner at the end of the conference). But after talking with us for a while, and learning that we are a collective formed out of the feminist movement, and learning about the range of films we have on offer, her whole demeanor changed – and we’ve now got a new fan.“I’m so glad you guys exist!” she told us. “And yes, you can quote me on that.” We are super glad that Gloria exists, too!

photoYun Suh, Gloria Gonzalez-Lopez, and Regan Brashear at Booth #301

The hours have flown by, talking with a lot of really interesting people like Gloria, who are teaching and researching a wide variety of social topics. In addition to inequality, visitors to Booth 301 have shared their interests in race, climate change, deviance, families, addiction, healthcare, and transnational movements – as well as the ever-evolving “social problems.” Sociology is an incredibly rich and diverse field, and we’ve had fascinating conversations with a diverse range of people – from grad students to tenured faculty, coming from institutions right here in the Bay Area and places as far-flung as Australia and Portugal. (“Do you have any films that are subtitled in Portuguese?” asked a woman visiting our booth this morning. Vanessa and Yun started to shake their heads in dismay, when Regan piped up with “Oh, yeah, my film is subtitled in Portuguese – the science museum in Lisbon provided it when they screened it.” Who knew?)

Which brings up an interesting dilemma for those of us representing the collection as a whole. We made a huge effort to see as many New Day films as possible prior to the conference – and to spread the viewing out so at lease one of us would have seen any given title – but with so many titles, and more arriving every day, it’s hard to keep up. Nevertheless, we’ve managed to get a pretty good handle on the collection – and it’s exciting to come up with films that satisfy a  particular need. (Disability & sexuality? How about Sins Invalid?! Environment and development? Try Taking Root! Families and disabilities? Read Me Differently! and more!)

We also got a visit from the Deputy Editor of the Teaching Sociology journal, Michele Kozimor-King, who was interested in finding films to review. The journal often pairs films with books on a relevant topic. We sent her away with a catalogue, postcards, and a few DVDs – but other New Day filmmakers should contact her if they are interested in having a specific new title reviewed!

The smallest visitor to our booth was Goby Greene, a Chihuahua service dog. Her mom – sociologist Dana Greene – told us that Goby is on Facebook (she is), and gave us one of her cards. We dutifully entered her into our drawing to win one free New Day film. If she wins, what will she pick? The Shrimp? Eating Alaska? Or maybe Bag It?

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Goby and her owner, Dana Greene
photo 1 goby card

 Goby’s business card