New Day Filmmaker Debra Chasnoff (1957-2017)

Chas Presenting in a Classroom

Our beloved member Debra “Chas” Chasnoff passed away recently after a 2-year battle with cancer.  Chas is an Academy Award-winning filmmaker whose work has fueled progressive social-change movements in many fields. She has 9 films in our collection. New Day meant the world to Chas, and she gave an enormous amount of energy to making it thrive. She lived her own life fully with great integrity, humor and engagement. She will truly be missed – an irreplaceable light in our independent film community.

Her full biography is here.   Read her eulogy in the New York Times here.

On Tuesday November 28, there will be a public memorial service from 3 to 5 p.m. at Spirit Rock Meditation Center, 5000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Woodacre 94973.

 

 

 

Commemorative Months

NATIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

November is National Native American Heritage Month, offering opportunities to celebrate and learn from indigenous histories, cultures, and struggles. Badger Creek is a new film by Jonathan Skurnik and Randy Vasquez about Native resilience as seen through a year in the life of three generations of a Blackfeet family in Montana. The Thick Dark Fog, made by the same filmmaking team, follows a Lakota man named Walter Littlemoon as he faces his boarding school history and heals himself and his community. You can visit New Day’s entire collection of films about Native American and Indigenous people here.

Badger Creek

 

TRANSGENDER AWARENESS WEEK

November also includes Transgender Awareness Week, a lead up to Transgender Day of Remembrance. New Day has a collection of films about trans people who are living, thriving, and charting new pathways for liberation. Thy Will be Done by Alice Dungan Bouvrie follows a trans woman named Sara Herwig in her journey to ordination in the Presbyterian Church. Mezzo by Nicole Opper celebrates the life and artistic endeavors of Breanna Sinclaire, an African-American opera singer and openly trans woman, while reflecting back on memories of her childhood and self-discovery. Out Run by Johnny Symons and Leo S. Chiang is about the dynamic leaders of the world’s only LGBT political party as they wage a historic quest to elect a trans woman to the Philippine Congress. Find these and more here.

Thy Will Be Done

 

 

MEET NEW DAY: RONIT BEZALEL

Ronit Bezalel

My film 70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green chronicles the fifteen-year demolition of Chicago’s Cabrini Green public housing complex, the subsequent building of mixed-income replacement homes, and the erasure of an African-American community. Cabrini Green was situated on some of the city’s most valuable real estate and was ultimately deemed by land developers to be too valuable for the low-income black community that lived there. The film grapples with questions of urban planning, gentrification, and who has a right to the city. When I arrived in Chicago in 1994 to study film at Columbia College, I was dismayed by the city’s racial divide. As a white woman, I was immediately told to avoid Cabrini Green, a low-income black community next to the city center. I wanted to understand why Chicago was so segregated, and why Cabrini Green was being torn down. People told me this was a land grab, and I sensed that there was a story that needed to be told. I contacted people at Cabrini Green and began learning about the community. I was introduced to Cabrini resident/activist Mark Pratt who was also a film student at Columbia College. We struck up a friendship that has endured over 20 years.

70 Acres in Chicago

I originally made a short film called  Voices of Cabrini  that looked at the initial demolitions. I continued to film for 15 additional years to follow the story through to completion and created 70 Acres in Chicago. While making both films, I tried to stay aware and humble. So many people want to fully “understand” Cabrini Green, and as outsiders we cannot. My role was to learn, listen, and help people share their stories. I cannot claim to “know” Cabrini, but I did my best to create a historical record of a community that no longer exists in the same way.

70 Acres in Chicago has proven a vital instructional tool for urban planners, city officials, and students who are trying to avoid the pitfalls of Chicago’s Plan for Housing Transformation. It has also served as an important catalyst for dialogue on issues of race and class. While the film focuses on Chicago, it has national resonance. Across the United States, communities of color are being disproportionately pushed outside of city centers because the land where they live has become too valuable in the real estate market.    

Learn more about Ronit and her work here.