Category Archives: Commemorative Months

National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month (recognized in March) is a time to elevate the focus and conversation on the mixed-ability world and what it means to be perceived as “different.”  

Joanne Hershfield’s personal documentary, The Gillian Film, is a bold examination of how we might transform our understanding of the meaning and worth of people with developmental disabilities.

Another intimate look at the subject is Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy, directed by Academy Award-nominee Alice Elliott. The film is an exploration of an unusual, symbiotic relationship between two people that some would call profoundly disabled.

Explore New Day’s collection of excellent films on disability-related topics here.

Commemorative Months: Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month, a time to celebrate the lives of women leaders as well as to center our attention on the stories of women less in the spotlight.

Yidl in the Middle: Growing Up Jewish In Iowa

In her film, Yidl in the Middle: Growing Up Jewish In Iowa, New Day filmmaker, Marlene Booth, examines the complicated process of negotiating identity — as an American, a Jew, and a woman.

The film Passionate Politics , by Tami Gold, tells the story of Charlotte Bunch, a civil rights organizer and lesbian activist, who becomes as an internationally-recognized leader of a campaign to put women’s rights on the global human rights agenda.  

A local story of the arrest of five African American lesbians who were violently and sexually-threatened by a man in the street is the subject of another important New Day film, blair dorosh-walther’s film Out in the Night.

You can find these titles and other films focused on Women and Women’s Studies here.

Commemorative Month: Black History Month

February is Black History Month, an annual celebration of achievements by Black Americans, a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history, and the struggles Black communities face as they move toward liberation.

Detroit 48202: Conversations Along a Postal Route

Detroit 48202: Conversations Along a Postal Route by Pam Sporn examines the rise, demise, and contested resurgence of the City of Detroit through the lens of African-American mail carrier, Wendell Watkins, and the committed community he faithfully served for thirty years. Saving Jackie by Selena Burks-Rentschler is a snapshot of a recovering addict’s attempt to strengthen her damaged relationship with her two estranged daughters, from the perspective of her elder daughter. Drawn Together: Comics, Diversity and Stereotypes by Harleen Singh traces the journey of three comic creators – a Black man, a Sikh man, and a white woman – who challenge notions of race, appearance, and gender stereotypes through cartoons, comics and cosplay.

You can find these and other films on African American subjects here.

12/18 Commemorative Month

In December, we observe Universal Human Rights Month in honor of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an international document adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on December 10, 1948. The Universal Declaration states basic rights and fundamental freedoms to which all human beings are entitled, including freedom from discrimination, the right to equality, and the right to be considered innocent until proven guilty.

Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today, originally made by Stuart Schulberg for the US Department of War in 1948 and remastered by his daughter Sandra Schulberg in recent years, shows the trial that established the “Nuremberg Principles,” providing the foundation for all subsequent trials for crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.

The Reckoning

In The Reckoning, by Paco de Onis and Pamela Yates, prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo faces down warlords, genocidal dictators and world superpowers in his struggle to bring perpetrators of crimes against humanity to justice. The Sandman, by Lauren Knapp, is a documentary short about Dr. Carlo Musso, a physician who has overseen Georgia’s lethal injection team since 2003, and his own moral equivocation providing “end of life care” to prisoners while personally opposing capital punishment. See these and other films about Human Rights here.

Nov 2018 Commemorative Months

November is National Native American Heritage Month, and New Day has a collection of films on Native American and Indigenous themes.

Badger Creek

Badger Creek, by Jonathan Skurnik and Randy Vasquez, is a portrait of Native resilience as seen through a year in the life of three generations of a Blackfeet (Pikuni) family living on the lower Blackfeet Reservation in Montana. Spirit of the Dawn, by Heidi Schmidt Emberling, exposes a history of educational abuse, and introduces us to two sixth graders as they participate in a poetry class where they write poems celebrating their Crow culture and history. In Whose Honor? by Jay Rosenstein takes a critical look at “Indian” sports mascots, following Native American mother Charlene Teters as she struggles to protect her cultural symbols and identity. View our collection here.

Mezzo

This November for Transgender Awareness Month, check out New Day’s collection of titles relevant to trans and nonbinary people. Prodigal Sons, by transgender filmmaker Kimberly Reed, is a profound story about homecoming, identity, and the complexity of family dynamics. Trinidad: Transgender Frontier, by PJ Raval, introduces the audience to three trans women whose lives intersect in the small town of Trinidad, Colorado, the so-called “sex change capital of the world.” Mezzo, by Nicole Opper, celebrates the life and art of Breanna Sinclaire, an African American trans woman opera singer. You can find these films and more here.

October: Commemorative Month

Sins Invalid: An Unshamed Claim to Beauty

October is National Disability Awareness Month, a time to learn about issues facing people with disabilities and celebrate their contributions. Kū Kanaka/Stand Tall, by Marlene Booth, follows a young disabled Native Hawaiian man, whose traumatic accident leads him to find healing through his indigenous language and history, and fight for his people. Tocando la Luz (Touch the Light , by Jennifer Redfearn, tells the story of three blind women in Havana, Cuba, who pursue their dreams while illuminating Cuba’s current economic and social landscape. Sins Invalid: An Unshamed Claim to Beauty documents a Bay Area performance project that highlights people of color and queer people with disabilities, creating work about disability, sexuality and social justice. See more films about disability here.

Justice For My Sister

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and New Day has a number of films that explore this often unseen undercurrent that exists in so many people’s lives. Power and Control: Domestic Violence in America, by Peter Cohn, follows a mother of three in Duluth, MN, as she struggles to protect herself and her children. (Peter Cohn has also made two companion films: Domestic Violence and Law Enforcement, and Domestic Violence and Health Care.) Men are Human, Women are Buffalo, by Joanne Hershfield, mixes interviews and puppetry to tell five stories about violence against women in Thailand, where it is reported that 44 percent of women have been abused by a partner or stranger. Justice for my Sister, by Kimberly Bautista, follows a Guatemalan woman through a three-year battle to hold her sister’s killer accountable, in one of the few cases of domestic violence murder in Guatemala that has resulted in a conviction.

Latinx Heritage Month!

Latinx Heritage Month is Sep 15, 2018 – Oct 15! This is a time to reflect on Latinx cultures, traditions, and forms of resistance.

El Cacao

El Cacao:The Challenge of Fair Trade, by Michelle Aguilar, exposes the dark side of chocolate production in Latin America, examining the economics of Fair Trade from the perspective of indigenous farmers.

When the Mountains Tremble

When the Mountains Tremble, by Pamela Yates, offers a remastered version of the 1983 classic documentary about Nobel Peace Laureate Rigoberta Menchú, a Maya K’iche indigenous leader who exposed violence and repression during Guatemala’s brutal armed conflict.

Los Trabajadores

Los Trabajadores: The American Paradox of Immigrant Labor, by Heather Courtney, follows two men named Juan and Ramón as they confront misperceptions and contradictions inherent to America’s dependence on, and abuse of, immigrant labor.

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You can find these films and more in New Day’s collection of Latinx Studies films, here.

 

August 2018 Commemorative Month

August 29 marks the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and New Day Films has a number of relevant documentaries that look deeply at the history and future of New Orleans.

Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans

Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, by Dawn Logsdon, explores the birthplace of civil rights, the New Orleans neighborhood that gave birth to jazz, launched America’s first black newspaper, and nurtured generations of Black activists.

Land of Opportunity

Land of Opportunity by Luisa Dantas and Rebecca Snedeker, dives deep into the tumultuous post-Katrina reconstruction of New Orleans through the eyes of urban planners, community organizers, displaced youth, immigrant workers, and public housing residents.

Mr. Cao Goes to Washington

Mr. Cao Goes to Washingtonby Leo Chiangfollows the journey of one of New Orlean’s rising political stars. Rep. Joseph Cao is the first Vietnamese American elected to the US Congress, the only non-white House Republican of the 111th Congress, and the only Republican to vote for President Obama’s Health Care Reform Bill. Can he keep his integrity and idealism intact in the face of political realities?

A Village Called Versailles
A Village Called Versailles, also by Leo Chiang, is the inspiring account of a community of Vietnamese refugees in New Orleans who rebuild their homes after Hurricane Katrina— only to have them threatened by a toxic landfill planned in their neighborhood. As the community fights back, it turns a devastating disaster into a catalyst for change.

Young Aspirations/Young Artists, by Shirley Thompson, is about a youth arts program that thrived in New Orleans before the flooding, and regrouped afterward in order to continue to offer life-changing opportunities to young artists in New Orleans.

Commemorative Months

 MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS MONTH

Downpour Resurfacing

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and the theme for 2018 is “Whole Body Mental Health” with the goal of increasing understanding of how the body’s various systems impact mental health. Downpour Resurfacing, by Frances Nkara, conveys psychiatrist and Buddhist teacher Dr. Robert Hall’s rekindled sense of self and strength as he recounts his childhood sexual and physical abuse. Unstuck, by Kelly Anderson and Chris Baier, documents OCD through the eyes of children who are facing their worst fears and finding solutions. Saving Jackie, by Selena Burks-Rentschler, is a snapshot of a recovering addict’s attempt to strengthen her damaged relationship with her two estranged daughters. Find these and more films related to Mental Health here.

LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER PRIDE MONTH

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (LGBT Pride Month), commemorating the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan. New Day has a diverse collection of films that highlight LGBT voices and stories. Thy Will Be Done highlights a trans woman named Sara Herwig as she moves toward ordination in the Presbyterian Church. The Family Journey: Raising Gender Nonconforming Children follows the journey of moms, dads and siblings of kids who are questioning whether they’re a boy, a girl, or something in between. 

Passionate Politics tells the story of Charlotte Bunch, a civil rights organizer, lesbian activist, and internationally-recognized leader of a campaign to put women’s rights on the global human rights agenda.

The Family Journey: Raising Gender Nonconforming Children

April 22 is Earth Day

Water Warriors

This April 22, celebrate Earth Day by learning about the incredible work being done to resist the destruction of our planet and protect the web of life. Water Warriors by Michael Premo is an exciting documentary about a community of indigenous people and settlers who come together to build a successful resistance against the oil and gas industry in New Brunswick, Canada. Burned: Are Trees the New Coal?, by Lisa Merton and Alan Dater, tells the story of the accelerating destruction of our forests for fuel, and the activists, ecologists, and concerned citizens who fight to protect their forests and communities. Find these films and more in our Environment & Sustainability collection.