Category Archives: Breaking News

Ten Ways New Day Films Changed People’s Lives in 2017

Unstuck: An OCD kids movie

1) Kelly Anderson and Chris Baier made Unstuck: an OCD kids movie after experiencing the devastating impact of OCD on their kids and seeing the positive effects of having children with OCD talk with one another. The film screened at the 2017 International OCD Foundation Conference in San Francisco, where 800 people gave the kids in the film a standing ovation. “It can be very isolating,” said Kat Nicole, a young adult with OCD. “We think we’re alone. To see that there are other kids out there who are also having their childhood taken away by this disorder, and that there’s a treatment, it provides a lot of hope.”

 

Out Run: Opening Night in Myanmar

2) Out Run, a film following the efforts to elect the first transgender woman to the Philippine Congress, was the Opening Night Film of the & Proud Yangon LGBT Film Festival in Myanmar, where directors S. Leo Chiang and Johnny Symons led a workshop for emerging queer Burmese filmmakers. “Having Johnny and Leo share their experiences as veteran documentarians of LGBTQ life was extremely instructive for our group,” said festival director Billy Stewart. “It inspired our up-and-coming filmmakers to tell their own personal and community stories.” Amnesty International Hong Kong also screened the film during their 2017 Carnival in February, then at their Human Rights Documentary Film Festival, and in the fall at local university campuses in Hong Kong with a satellite screening in Mumbai, India.

 

Vida Diferida (Life, Deferred)

3) In response to the Trump administration’s threat to end DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), Brenda Avila-Hanna and Corey Ohama streamed their films Vida Diferida (Life, Deferred) and I Was Born In Mexico, But…. for free for the month of September. The films were viewed more than 600 times as part of the campaign DREAMerDocs.com. Both films reveal what it was like for young, undocumented immigrants before and after DACA became U.S. policy in 2012, and what these young people stand to lose with its dismantling.

 

Care

4) Deirdre Fishel and Tony Heriza’s documentary Care, an intimate look inside the world of in-home elder care, was central to the launch of the NY Caring Majority Campaign fighting for universal long-term care. “It’s been an incredible organizing tool,” reports Zahara Zahav, from Jews for Racial and Economic Justice. “The film gives the audience permission to talk about their own personal experiences. We have to have the conversations in public in order to move the movement forward.”

 

Hunting in Wartime

5) “Gunalchéesh to our Alaska Native Veterans for showing us grace and dignity,” wrote Daxkilatch Ka Zeetlieesh after viewing Samantha Farinella’s Hunting in Wartime on PBS. “As a result of this documentary, I find myself seeking out more opportunities to become more trauma-informed as well as best practices when supporting our people with PTSD.” The filmmaker also heard from Val Veeler, daughter of veteran Victor Bean, who appears in the film: “Hunting in Wartime let my father heal from mental wounds and helped him become part of the community again before his death.”

Daddy Don’t Go

6) In November Emily Abt screened her film Daddy Don’t Go for caseworkers and staff in partnership with New York City’s Human Resources Administration. The film features four disadvantaged fathers in New York City as they struggle to beat the odds and defy the deadbeat dad stereotype. Alan S. Farrell, the Assistant Deputy Commissioner of the Office of Child Support Enforcement, said, “The event took over two years to come together, but in the end, it was completely worthwhile. I believe HRA will use Daddy Don’t Go as a meaningful organizing tool and catalyst moving forward.”

 

Ramped Up

7) Three of Reid Davenport’s films on disability and the fight for access and inclusion screened on TED in 2017: A Cerebral Game, Wheelchair Diaries and the trailer for Ramped Up. Reid’s TED talk led to a “Brief But Spectacular” piece that aired on PBS NewsHour. “I have cerebral palsy,” said Davenport. “My diagnosis is not my biggest obstacle. My biggest obstacle is people’s responses to my diagnosis. There need to be more filmmakers with disabilities so they can experience the catharsis that I have been able to experience.”

 

DADDY AND PAPA

8) Reproductive sociologist Linda Layne reviewed seven documentaries about gay parenting and gave Johnny Symons’ Daddy & Papa two thumbs way up. In a British biomedical journal article, she described it as “beautifully crafted and brimming with love.” Layne and her colleagues at the University of Cambridge are using the film as part of their reproductive research group.

 

Kamau Bell

9) Comedian and political provocateur W. Kamau Bell, of CNN’s United Shades of Color, interviewed Debbie Lum about Seeking Asian Female, her humorous and provocative documentary about white American men pursuing Asian women. Bell declared the film “great…and disturbing.” In an episode exploring stereotypes and the significance of Chinese-American culture, Bell remarked, “Some people in the United States have an extremely narrow view of who is and who isn’t an American. Chinatown is as American as fireworks on the Fourth of July, Rice Krispies, The New York Times, and iPhones.

 

Finding Kukan

10) Robin Lung’s Finding Kukan, about the forgotten story of a pioneering female filmmaker, inspired viewers to document their own families’ untold stories, including a 63-year-old doctor who began interviewing her mother about her early life in Germany, and a film media major at UC Irvine who started documenting her grandparents’ war experiences in China. Young journalist Aya Bisbee wrote, “Lung’s film was a beautiful demonstration of the power in stories and the urgency for us to remember and tell the stories of our community. I am putting together some oral histories from family members, focusing on my Japanese-American grandmother whom I never had the chance to meet, but whose name I carry forward.”

BREAKING NEWS

Kelly Anderson

New Day is delighted to announce that the 2017 DWG George C. Stoney Award for Outstanding Documentary Work has just been awarded to our very own filmmaker Kelly Anderson! The “Stoney” award has been given since 2013 to individuals who demonstrate the values George Stoney promoted throughout his career–stories that represent the poor, the lesser known, the working class, and as a hallmark, engage social injustice themes. Previous winners include Michael Rabiger, Alan Rosenthal, Patricia Aufderheide, and Gordon Quinn.

Kelly is Professor of Media Studies at Hunter College (CUNY) where she teaches in the Integrated Media Arts MFA program. Her most recent film My Brooklyn on the gentrification and redevelopment of downtown Brooklyn was broadcast on the PBS World series America ReFramed. Her other work includes Never Enough, a documentary about clutter which won an award for Artistic Excellence at the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, and Every Mother’s Son (co-directed with Tami Gold), a documentary about mothers whose children were killed by police officers, which won the Audience Award at the Tribeca Film Festival, aired on POV, and was nominated for a national Emmy for Directing. Kelly’s other documentaries include Out At Work (with Tami Gold), which screened at the Sundance Film Festival, was broadcast on HBO and won a GLAAD Award for Best Documentary. She is the author (with Martin Lucas) of Documentary Voice & Vision: A Creative Approach to Non-fiction Media Production. Kelly is currently working on the short documentary UNSTUCK: An OCD Kids Movie.

10 Ways New Day Films Changed People’s Lives in 2015

  1. The U.S. Department of Education hosted a special screening
    I LEARN AMERICA [1]
    I Learn America
    of Jean-Michel Dissard and Gitte Peng’s documentary I Learn America, during which Secretary of Education Arne Duncan declared, “The students represented in the film need to be seen and supported as national assets in our schools.” This fall, the New York State Department of Education started using the film to train teachers to work with immigrant youth, and is now looking to make the project available to all of its middle and high schools.                                                    
  2. 2015 was the year TIME magazine declared the “Transgender Tipping Point,” and director Kimberly Reed was invited to make appearances on NBC, MSNBC, and ABC due to her autobiographical film Prodigal Sons (the first theatrically-released film by a trans director). The film has continued to move audiences, leading one transgender viewer to say, “Thank you for choosing to be so visible about yourself, your life, and your identities — your film certainly helped me in my process of transitioning,” and another to add, “Your film Prodigal Sons was instrumental in helping me by bringing understanding to my family. Thank you.”
  3. A researching team at Notre Dame University published a study
    FxEm8n4KJ
    Fixed

    in the Journal of Responsible Innovation on how Regan Brashear’s documentary Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement shifted the viewpoints of scientists and bioengineering researchers on the ethical and social implications of their work. The research cited how the film’s varying perspectives of disability caused viewers to reconsider “profound personal and societal questions.”

  4. In New York’s Nassau County, over 50 matrimonial lawyers were
    SPLIT_PHOTO
    Split

    treated to a screening of Split, Ellen Bruno‘s short documentary on divorce, shot entirely from the perspective of children. The film received glowing reviews, with many lawyers declaring their intention to show the film to their clients and others making plans to share it more widely with child advocate attorneys and family court judges.

  5. Greta Schiller’s The Marion Lake Story inspired several community ecological restoration projects, including the clean-up of a phragmite-overgrown wetland in Groton, Connecticut, and the creation of a rain garden by students at Timber Creek High School, a service learning school in Orlando, Florida. Wendy Doromal, a supervising teacher at Timber Creek High, wrote that the “moving story exemplifies environmental stewardship and beautifully shows how a united effort can positively impact a community.
  6. Disruption, Paco de Onis and Pamela Yates’s feature documentary
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    Disruption

    about a cutting-edge group of Latin American social entrepreneurs, played widely across Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru as the centerpiece of the Disrupt Poverty Tour. Following screenings of the film in town centers, local youth and women were trained to design and administer digital surveys analyzing the level of women’s financial inclusion in their communities for eventual presentation to NGOs and governments.

  7. The West Virginia Foundation for Rape and Information Services began using Debra Chasnoff‘s Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up in statewide rape crisis centers to help with its mission to prevent and address sexual violence, stalking and dating violence. The film has been instrumental in helping to create understanding around how gender norm pressures can lead to unhealthy decision-making– a key to preventing future violence.
  8. After a screening of Tracing Roots: A Weaver’s Journey at Yale University, a student and member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma told filmmaker Ellen Frankenstein how important the film was to affirming her identity: “A lot of Yale students have never been around Native Americans before and it feels strange when I’m trying to explain where I come from.”
  9. Hospitals, medical schools, and rehab facilities across the country
    States of Grace
    States of Grace

    held screenings of States of Grace. After a screening at the Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, the Senior Vice-President & Chief Nursing Officer wrote to filmmakers Mark Lipman and Helen Cohen, “The response for days following your presentation was nothing short of overwhelming…Many people said that they felt it could make a difference in the way we care for patients.”  Others added: “You have nourished my spirit as a bedside nurse” and “Reminds us all why we became health care professionals.”

  10. Ellen Brodsky traveled to Seoul, South Korea, with The Year We Thought About Love, her award-winning film about a LGBTQ youth theater troupe. After the screening, a young woman shyly raised her hand and said, “I have two friends who came out to me. After watching your film, I think I can now be a better friend. Thank you.

New Day Films is now on Kanopy!

logoNew Day Films is proud to announce our partnership with the Kanopy streaming service. Through this collaboration, students and faculty at more than 800 universities and colleges worldwide are already streaming all or part of New Day’s collection, and the list continues to grow.

“We are incredibly excited about this partnership because it will extend the reach of our collection, which has been a trusted resource for educators across a wide range of subject areas for over four decades,” said New Day Co-Chairs Leo Chiang and Kelly Anderson. “We are particularly enthusiastic about Kanopy’s innovative Patron-Driven-Acquisition (PDA) program, which allows institutions to make licensing decisions based on what students and faculty are actively watching.”

Kanopy augments our existing streaming platform, New Day Digital, which continues to provide a variety of digital streaming licenses for New Day titles. New Day and Kanopy will be at the National Media Market together and look forward to talking with librarians and educators about our new partnership and streaming our films on your campus.

To browse the New Day Collection on Kanopy, visit https://www.kanopystreaming.com/category/supplier/new-day-films. For more info about New Day Digital, visit newdaydigital.com. Information about New Day can be found at www.newday.com.

Breaking News

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)
Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)

New Day Filmmakers have been busy breaking ground in August! On August 4, our very own Luis Argueta was awarded the Order of Quetzal following the premiere of his latest documentary ABRAZOS in Guatemala City. Argueta, whose 1994 fiction film The Silence of Neto set a precedent in the Guatemalan film industry, became the first-ever filmmaker to receive Guatemala’s highest national medal for his passionate stories about migrants. In a moving acceptance speech, Argueta said “I dedicate this award to the millions of migrants who’ve left their homes, risked everything and who toil every day without knowing if they will return home that night.” Learn more about his important works abUSed: The Postville Raid and ABRAZOS.

David Alvarado
David Alvarado

And on August 13, New Day filmmaker David Alvarado and filmmaking partner Jason Sussberg made history when their documentary-in-progress on Bill Nye the Science Guy became the highest grossing documentary ever on the crowdfunding website Kickstarter. With an initial goal of $650,000, their campaign raised nearly $860,000 thanks to the help of 16,850 backers. Their new film follows Bill Nye the Science Guy, host of the popular children’s science show, in his “epic quest to change the world.” Both filmmakers cite Bill Nye as a large influence in their decision to start making films about science and technology. Learn more about Alvarado’s previous short film Indelible Mark.